Pest descriptions

Below is a list of commonly asked questions regarding pests and the protection of your home. If you still have a question, feel free to send us an email from our contact page.

  • Bees

    The most common stinging bee in Nebraska is the honey bee. It was introduced into this country from Europe in the 17th century. Its stinger, which resembles a hypodermic needle with barbs, is used to inject a mixture of alkali venom and acid into the skin. The alkali venom contains several kinds of proteins and enzymes which are believed to cause allergic reactions of varying degrees in humans. We provide bee control services such as bee extermination and bee hive removal. Leaving the Honey comb will result in future and immediate problems.
  • Rats

    The fact about rats is that they are everywhere and not easy to control unless you are a professional. Specifications for rats can vary. The length of an average rat is from 6-18 inches that's including their tail. Roof rats tend to be charcoal gray in color as compared to your sewer rat which is a brownish tan. Their diet consists of eating almost everything, its not much of a diet. They consume ½ to 2oz of liquid a day. These are nocturnal creatures they eat and drink under the cover of darkness. They are loud and gnaw at anything they can, rats have been known to cause electrical fires in homes by exposed electrical wires in attics. Rats are the cause of much damage and carriers of parasites and diseases.
  • Pigeons

    Pigeons mate for life and rear their broods together, although if one dies the other will take a new mate. Once the simple nest is built, the female lays an egg and then another a day or so later. The incubation period for common pigeons is 17 to 19 days. The female sits on the egg from late afternoon through the night until about 10AM. The male then takes over and does the day shift. Once the eggs hatch, both parents feed the young squabs. The first food is pigeon milk or crop milk, a cheesy substance that appears in the crops of the parents at hatching time and is fed for a week or so. Then the adults start regurgitating partially digested grains for the young. By the time the squabs are ready to fly, about 4 weeks, the father is doing most of the feeding. The squabs are fed for another week to 10 days after they are free-flying.
  • Silverfish

    Silverfish are always wingless and are silvery to brown in color because their bodies are covered with fine scales. They are generally soft bodied. Adults are up to 3/4 inch long, flattened from top to bottom, elongated and oval in shape, have three long tail projections and two long antennae. Primarily a nuisance pest inside the home or buildings; can contaminate food, damage paper goods and stain clothing; medically harmless. Many of their habits are similar to cockroaches and they appear to be more common as household pests in drier parts of the state. Occasionally damage book bindings, curtains, wallpaper.
  • American Cockroach

    This cockroach is about 1 1/2" long as an adult. It is reddish-brown with light markings behind the head. The cerci at the tip of the abdomen are long and thin. In residential areas, these cockroaches live in basements and sewers, and may move outdoors into yards during warm weather. These cockroaches are common in basements, crawl spaces, cracks and crevices of porches, foundations, and walkways adjacent to buildings. They are reddish brown and have a yellowish margin on the body region behind the head. Immature cockroaches resemble adults except that they are wingless.
  • Fleas

    Adult fleas are flattened from side to side, dark colored, wingless and have strongly developed legs. Their hind pair of legs are especially adapted for jumping. They have sucking mouthparts used to siphon out the blood of animals. Larvae are worm-like, legless and tan. They feed on organic debris, dried blood and excrement from adult fleas. Fleas usually bite humans where clothing fits tightly against the body. Adult fleas can live for several weeks without a blood meal. When found indoors, they are usually associated with pet dogs or cats. Fleas can transmit several diseases including bubonic plague and tularemia. They are also the carriers of a tapeworm which, in the adult stage, is found in dogs and men.

  • Black Widow

    Female is one-half inch long; shiny black, with hourglass-shaped red mark on underside of abdomen. Can be found almost anywhere, indoors or out; prefer to build their nests close to the ground. They eat insects trapped in webs made by females. Contrary to popular belief, female is usually unsuccessful in any attempt to eat the male after mating; 300 to 400 eggs are laid in silken cocoon, hatch in about 10 days. Black widows are not aggressive, and will not bite unless provoked. However, they are poisonous. If bitten, seek medical attention; bites are rarely fatal.
  • Termites

    Termites mostly feed on dead plant material, generally in the form of wood, leaf litter, soil, or animal dung, and about 10% of the estimated 4,000 species (about 2,600 taxonomically known) are economically significant as pests that can cause serious structural damage to buildings, crops or plantation forests. Termites are major detritivores, particularly in the subtropical and tropical regions, and their recycling of wood and other plant matter is of considerable ecological importance. Termites are sometimes called "white ants", though they are not closely related to true ants.
  • Bedbugs

    The name 'bedbug' is derived from the insect's preferred habitat of houses and especially beds or other areas where people sleep. Bedbugs, though not strictly nocturnal, are mainly active at night and are capable of feeding unnoticed on their hosts. Bedbugs have been known by a variety of names including wall louse, mahogany flat, crimson rambler, heavy dragoon, chinche, and redcoat. Adult bedbugs are reddish-brown, flattened, oval, and wingless. Bedbugs have microscopic hairs that give them a banded appearance. Adults grow to 4–5 mm in length and 1.5–3 mm wide.
>>>